New Report: International public finance for fossil fuels dropped in 2021, but a rebound is likely unless key governments deliver on pledges

November 1, 2022By OCI TeamFeatured, Press Releases No Comments

A report released today by Oil Change International and Friends of the Earth U.S. reveals that between 2019 and 2021 the G20 countries and multilateral development banks (MDBs) provided at least USD 55 billion per year in international public finance for fossil fuels. This is a 35% drop compared to previous years (2016-2018), but still almost twice the support provided for clean energy, which averaged only $29 billion per year.

At a Crossroads: Assessing G20 and MDB international energy finance ahead of stop funding fossils pledge deadline

November 1, 2022By OCI TeamBriefings, Featured 3 Comments

This report looks at G20 country and MDB traceable international public finance for fossil fuels from 2019-2021 and finds they are still backing at least USD 55 billion per year in oil, gas, and coal projects. This is a 35% drop compared to previous years (2016-2018), but still, almost twice the support provided for clean energy, which averaged only $29 billion per year.

CSOs welcome historic 20+ country-strong commitment to end international oil, gas, and coal finance by end of 2022, say others need to follow

November 4, 2021By LaurieBlog Post, News, Press Releases, Stop Funding Fossils

Today at COP26, more than 20 countries and institutions launched a joint statement committing to end direct international public finance for coal, oil and gas by the end of 2022 and prioritize clean energy finance. This initiative could directly shift more than USD 18 billion a year of support out of fossil fuels and into clean energy.

Canada’s Big Oil Reality Check: Major oil and gas producers undercut Canada’s commitment to 1.5ºC

November 3, 2021By OCI TeamEnergy Transitions & Futures, Featured, Reports

The assessment by Environmental Defence Canada and Oil Change International assesses eight of Canada’s top oil and gas producers, including Imperial (ExxonMobil) and Shell. It finds they are all on track to increase their oil and gas production in Canada, rather than planning a fair transition away from fossil fuels that are fuelling the climate crisis.