Japan’s Dirty Secret: World’s top fossil fuel financier is fueling climate chaos and undermining energy security

November 8, 2022By OCI TeamBriefings, Featured No Comments

This briefing, “Japan’s Dirty Secret: World’s top fossil fuel financier is fueling climate chaos and undermining energy security,” reveals that Japan is the world’s largest public financier of fossil fuel projects, providing 10.6 billion USD per year between 2019 and 2021. Japan has been leading the drive to expand gas consumption in Asia and is the world’s leading financier of gas infrastructure globally, spending USD 6.7 billion on gas projects on average each year between 2019 and 2021.

At a Crossroads: Assessing G20 and MDB international energy finance ahead of stop funding fossils pledge deadline

November 1, 2022By OCI TeamBriefings, Featured 3 Comments

This report looks at G20 country and MDB traceable international public finance for fossil fuels from 2019-2021 and finds they are still backing at least USD 55 billion per year in oil, gas, and coal projects. This is a 35% drop compared to previous years (2016-2018), but still, almost twice the support provided for clean energy, which averaged only $29 billion per year.

Spain joins commitment to end international oil, gas, and coal finance, bringing total for potential finance shifted to USD 23.6 billion per year 

November 10, 2021By LaurieBlog Post, News, Press Releases, Stop Funding Fossils

This increases the number of signatories to 30 and the annual average of potential public finance shifted out of fossil fuels and into clean energy to at least USD 23.6 billion per year. This equals 37% of annual public finance for fossil fuels provided by G20 countries and the Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs) between 2018 and 2020. 

The Sky’s Limit Africa: The Case for a Just Energy Transition from Fossil Fuel Production in Africa

October 14, 2021By OCI TeamAfrica, Featured, Reports, Resources 1 Comment

The Sky’s Limit Africa assesses fossil fuel industry plans to sink USD $230 billion into the development of new extraction projects in Africa in the next decade — and USD $1.4 trillion by 2050. It finds these projects are not compatible with a safe climate future and that they are at risk of becoming stranded assets that leave behind unfunded clean-up, shortfalls of government revenue, and overnight job losses.

Biden’s climate diplomacy mustn’t turn a blind eye to Big Oil’s “dirty footprints” in Africa

March 15, 2021By Chairman OkoloiseBlog Post, Deep Dive, Featured

When President Joe Biden signed his first set of Executive Orders on Climate Change and cancelled the Keystone XL pipeline project soon after his inauguration, he sent a very clear message to the global fossil fuel industry: it’s no longer going to be business-as-usual with fighting the existential threat that climate change poses to humanity.