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Cashing in on All of the Above: U.S. Fossil Fuel Production Subsidies under Obama

Oil Change International

July 2014



A new report by Oil Change International, Cashing in on All of the Above: U.S. Fossil Fuel Production Subsidies under Obama, demonstrates the huge and growing amount of subsidies going to the fossil fuel industry in the U.S. every year. In 2013, the U.S. federal and state governments gave away $21.6 billion in subsidies for oil, gas, and coal exploration and production.

The value of fossil fuel exploration and production subsidies from the federal government have increased by 45 percent since President Obama took office

Category: Reports

Runaway Train: The Reckless Expansion of Crude-by-Rail in North America.

Oil Change International, May 2014.

This report tracks the rise of crude-by-rail in North America, detailing where crude trains are being loaded and unloaded, how many trains carrying crude oil are crossing the North American continent, and who is involved in this burgeoning trade.

This report is the first in a series covering North America’s booming crude-by-rail industry and is being published in conjunction with a unique interactive online map of crude-by-rail terminals and potential routes.

Future reports in this series will look at the economics of crude-by-rail, safety, and climate change issues.

Please see www.priceofoil.org/rail for the map and links to reports





Polluting Our Democracy and Our Environment: Dirty Fuels Money in Politics
Oil Change International and Sierra Club
April 2014

A new report by Oil Change International and the Sierra Club, Polluting Our Democracy and Our Environment: Dirty Fuels Money in Politics, demonstrates the enormous amount of campaign finance contributions pouring into Congress by the fossil fuel industry, a problem that is only getting worse. With the 2010 Supreme Court decision in Citizens United v. FEC, super-wealthy donors can now funnel unlimited amounts of outside money into political campaigns and elections. As a result of this ruling, outside spending increased by an enormous11,761

Lifting the Ban, Cooking the Climate
The Climate Impact of Lifting the Crude Oil Export Ban
March 2014

The U.S. oil industry’s biggest players, including ExxonMobil and the American Petroleum Institute, are calling for an end to the U.S. ban on crude oil exports that has been in place for more than four decades since the 1973 Arab oil embargo. Their reasons are clear, as lifting the ban would boost profits by enabling companies to sell American oil at higher global market prices.

What few have considered, however, are the climate impacts that would result from ending the ban. Allowing U.S. crude oil

In 2009, President Obama made a commitment to reduce U.S. greenhouse gases by 17 percent by 2020.  The Obama administration put this forward as the U.S. share of a global effort to limit climate change to no more than two degrees Celsius – the target scientists tell us may be safe.  Achieving this target, which has been unanimously agreed on a global level, is central to the success of President Obama’s Climate Action Plan, announced in June of last year.

It is therefore shocking to realize that the State Department completely failed to take this target into account when evaluating the



With just a few days left until the 19th Conference of the Parties (COP) of the United Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) conference draws to a close, time is running out to reach a meaningful agreement on providing climate finance for developing countries - a key component of the negotiations.

But as shown in a briefing released by Oil Change International today, while Annex 2 (developed) countries continue to debate how to honor their commitment to provide $100 billion each year by 2020 to help developing countries reduce emissions and adapt to climate impacts, these same countries are providing five

Our latest report released today exposes U.S. oil producers that want to export crude oil despite the fact that they still only produce barely more than 50% of U.S. oil demand. 40 years on from the Arab oil embargo and America’s oil producers have only one thing on their minds; profits.

Lifting crude export restrictions would bring U.S. oil prices in line with international prices and enable oil producers to charge U.S. refiners more. This is the focus of increasing calls from the industry and its investors for an end to crude oil export restrictions.

The U.S. oil boom is based on

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