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More on Kyoto: The environment group, Friends of the Earth has said that Governments who signed up to the Protocol are failing to take the necessary action to ensure that emission targets are met.

According to FoE, emissions data from countries who signed up to Kyoto reveal that many are still failing to bring carbon emissions under control - with emissions in Italy, Canada, and Austria all increasing since 1990. UK emissions are also now rising - putting the UK's Kyoto commitments in jeopardy.

Mike Childs, Head of Campaigns at FoE argues: "The UK likes to claim world leadership on climate change.

For nearly fifty years Shell has been flaring gas in the Niger Delta in vast quantities. The practice is a major cause of greenhouse gas emissions, and a major source of air, noise and light pollution for the people of the Niger Delta. It causes huge resentment amongst the communities who bear the brunt of oil exploration. In a ground-breaking ruling, on 14 November last year a Nigerian Court ordered Shell to stop gas flaring in Iwherekan, in the Niger Delta.

So far, Shell has not done so.

Now Friends of the Earth has set up a website where you can email

Tomorrow is the first Anniversary of the UN Kyoto Protocol taking effect.

A year on the Protocol is fundamentally weakened by the Bush Administration's refusal to sign up to it. However some parts of the agreement are booming - especially carbon trading.

Carbon dioxide is now one of the world's fastest-growing markets, worth as much as 34 billion euros (40.2 billion dollars) annually by the end of this decade, according to some analysts.

"The carbon market is going very well. We've seen tremendous growth this year," argues Henrik Hasselknippe, senior analyst at Point Carbon, a firm that monitors the CO2 pollution business. Much

Whats the US Congress' response to record profits and high gas prices? Why its royalty relief for the oil & gas industry, of course! According to this morning's New York Times, "the government will give up more than $7 billion in payments between now and 2011. The companies are expected to get the largess, known as royalty relief, even though the administration assumes that oil prices will remain above $50 a barrel throughout that period.". Yikes. Separation of Oil & State, anyone?

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