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Now – you might start thinking we have it in for BP, especially in the Arctic region. No, this is not true. The company seems to be doing enough damage to its corporate reputation and the environment without us. But now it faces further criticism for its operations. This time from the head of the British Antarctic Survey (BAS).

BP has admitted that it has found yet another pipeline break caused by corrosion on the North Slope, at the same time it faces a criminal investigation into its management of pipelines and six weeks after the company caused the worst spill on the North Slope. “We are at the point where there is so much damage to the lines from corrosion, we don't know where another leak will occur," says Marc Kovac, a BP worker. Well that is reassuring - especially given the other news today (see above).

During his tenure as one of the world’s most powerful oilmen, Lee Raymond who retired as Exxon’s Chief Executive last December, was vilified by environmentalists for his stance on climate change. Over the last decade Exxon has led the way to derail any action on the issue. The consequences of Raymond’s actions will be felt by the world for decades  to come.

A quarter century ago, when I began purchasing cigarettes and gasoline in significant quantities, a pack of smokes and a gallon of gas went for about the same price – 65 or 70 cents.

Last week, a gallon gas was selling for about $2.65 in Vermont and while I was filling up, I noticed a pack of cigarettes now sells for $4.80. Some addictions are more expensive than others. I quit smoking years ago, but it was not the price of cigarettes that changed my behavior, I was just done smoking.

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